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Seth Godin has written 12 bestsellers that have been translated into 33 languages

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All Marketers Tell Stories

Seth's most important book about the art of marketing

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Free Prize Inside

The practical sequel to Purple Cow

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Linchpin

An instant bestseller, the book that brings all of Seth's ideas together.

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Meatball Sundae

Why the internet works (and doesn't) for your business. And vice versa.

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Permission Marketing

The classic Named "Best Business Book" by Fortune.

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poke.the.box

Poke The Box

The latest book, Poke The Box is a call to action about the initiative you're taking - in your job or in your life, and Seth once again breaks the traditional publishing model by releasing it through The Domino Project.

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purple.cow

Purple Cow

The worldwide bestseller. Essential reading about remarkable products and services.

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Small is the New Big

A long book filled with short pieces from Fast Company and the blog. Guaranteed to make you think.

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survival.is.not.enough

Survival is Not Enough

Seth's worst seller and personal favorite. Change. How it works (and doesn't).

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the.big.moo

The Big Moo

All for charity. Includes original work from Malcolm Gladwell, Tom Peters and Promise Phelon.

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the.big.red.fez

The Big Red Fez

Top 5 Amazon ebestseller for a year. All about web sites that work.

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the.dip

The Dip

A short book about quitting and being the best in the world. It's about life, not just marketing.

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The Icarus Deception

Seth's most personal book, a look at the end of the industrial economy and what happens next.

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Tribes

"Book of the year," a perennial bestseller about leading, connecting and creating movements.

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Unleashing the Ideavirus

More than 3,000,000 copies downloaded, perhaps the most important book to read about creating ideas that spread.

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v.is.for.vulnerable

V Is For Vulnerable

A short, illustrated, kids-like book that takes the last chapter of Icarus and turns it into something worth sharing.

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we.are.all.weird

We Are All Weird

The end of mass and how you can succeed by delighting a niche.

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whatcha.gonna.do.with.that.duck

Whatcha Gonna Do With That Duck?

The sequel to Small is the New Big. More than 600 pages of the best of Seth's blog.

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Godin's Leveraged Effort Curve

GraphAmong highly-compensated workers, the amount of work you get paid for actually goes down as you get paid more.

A talented doctor spends no more than ten or fifteen minutes a day actually doing the thing that she's actually gifted at

An insightful web designer spends just a few minutes a day actually doing insightful web design.

A great lawyer might be pushed to the edge of his talents once or twice a week.

The same goes for salespeople, farmers, novelists and hockey players. The baseline level of talent in most professions is pretty high, and the really exceptional people shine only rarely.

There's too much overhead. A doctor needs to fill out forms, meet salespeople, answer phone calls, travel from hospital to hospital, manager her staff and every once in a while, see a patient. And most of those patients are run of the mill cases that a medical student could handle.

I'm talking about knowledge workers, obviously. Knowledge workers get paid extra when they show insight or daring or do what others can't. But packaging the knowledge is expensive, time consuming and not parituclarly enjoyable for most people. As you get better at what you do, it seems as though you spend more and more time on the packaging and less on the doing.

(and yes, I know the chart above is about infected acorns, but it had the right slope)

The exception?

The intense conversations you can have with your customers and prospects, especially via a blog. Once you get the system and the structure set up, five minutes of effort can give you four minutes of high leverage idea time in front of the people you're trying to influence.

When the net is broken (spam, popups, cc lists, most instant messaging) it just adds more "time overhead" to what you do. But when it's working, it allows ideas to be stripped down to their essence and allows you to really push.

The temptation, when living without the time overhead, is to invent new overhead so you can stall. All these features available on blogs allow bloggers to spend time doing diligent housekeeping, with the excuse that it's necessary. In fact, by stripping away the time overhead, what it means to be a knowledge worker might just change.

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Godin's Leveraged Effort Curve:

» How well do you leverage your time? from Mastering the Web
Seth has a great post (love the weevil graph!) about the ever-increasing amounts of time that seem to get sucked into "administrivia" the further one gets in any knowledge-based profession. He suggests that the freedom of a blog strips away the fluff t... [Read More]

» A Post in time saves... from Achievable Ends
Infected Acorns notwithstanding, Seth Godin's Leveraged Effort Curve hits the mark.Knowledge workers get paid extra when they show insight or daring or do what others can't. But packaging the knowledge is expensive, time consuming and not particularly ... [Read More]

» Why success can make for lousy work from Writelife
There’s a fascinating book by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi called Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience and it helps to explain why the more successful you become in today’s world of work, the more your work becomes a nightmare from which you [Read More]

» Godin's Leveraged Effort Curve from
Why highly paid people actually work less. [Read More]

» On Working Less and More from DarrenBarefoot.com
Via Digg or Delicious or somewhere, I discovered John Wesleys speculation on not necessarily working eight hours a day: After a couple hours of intense work, energy levels drop and workers downgrade to less demanding tasks like responding to ema... [Read More]

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