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SETH'S BOOKS

Seth Godin has written 12 bestsellers that have been translated into 33 languages

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Bonus stuff!

or click on a title below to see the list

all.marketers.tell.stories

All Marketers Tell Stories

Seth's most important book about the art of marketing

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

free.prize.inside

Free Prize Inside

The practical sequel to Purple Cow

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

linchpin

Linchpin

An instant bestseller, the book that brings all of Seth's ideas together.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

meatball.sundae

Meatball Sundae

Why the internet works (and doesn't) for your business. And vice versa.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

permission.marketing

Permission Marketing

The classic Named "Best Business Book" by Fortune.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

poke.the.box

Poke The Box

The latest book, Poke The Box is a call to action about the initiative you're taking - in your job or in your life, and Seth once again breaks the traditional publishing model by releasing it through The Domino Project.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

purple.cow

Purple Cow

The worldwide bestseller. Essential reading about remarkable products and services.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

small.is.the.new.big

Small is the New Big

A long book filled with short pieces from Fast Company and the blog. Guaranteed to make you think.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

survival.is.not.enough

Survival is Not Enough

Seth's worst seller and personal favorite. Change. How it works (and doesn't).

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.moo

The Big Moo

All for charity. Includes original work from Malcolm Gladwell, Tom Peters and Promise Phelon.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.red.fez

The Big Red Fez

Top 5 Amazon ebestseller for a year. All about web sites that work.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.dip

The Dip

A short book about quitting and being the best in the world. It's about life, not just marketing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.icarus.deception

The Icarus Deception

Seth's most personal book, a look at the end of the industrial economy and what happens next.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

tribes

Tribes

"Book of the year," a perennial bestseller about leading, connecting and creating movements.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

unleashing.the.ideavirus

Unleashing the Ideavirus

More than 3,000,000 copies downloaded, perhaps the most important book to read about creating ideas that spread.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

v.is.for.vulnerable

V Is For Vulnerable

A short, illustrated, kids-like book that takes the last chapter of Icarus and turns it into something worth sharing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

we.are.all.weird

We Are All Weird

The end of mass and how you can succeed by delighting a niche.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

whatcha.gonna.do.with.that.duck

Whatcha Gonna Do With That Duck?

The sequel to Small is the New Big. More than 600 pages of the best of Seth's blog.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:


THE DIP BLOG by Seth Godin




All Marketers Are Liars Blog




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Member since 08/2003

« March 2005 | Main | May 2005 »

So a rabbi, a priest, a talking duck and a blonde walk into a bar...

Do you feel a joke coming on?

We've been taught where to look for jokes. Certain places and times feel joke-friendly, and we're alert and aware of what's coming. The web is changing the vernacular daily, and I discovered this first hand with my vacation email memo from last week.

Here's an excerpt:

If you need to find me, I'll be at the UN for a few days, working on the oil for food scandal. You can reach me at the UN at 212 355 4165. Then I'll be in Beijing, consulting with the government on how they can more effectively do the messaging for the upcoming Olympics. I believe that their mascot is sending exactly the wrong message, and hope to persuade them to start using a cow.

I'll be ending the week at Beverly Hills Hilton in California, (a bungalow, just ask for me at the desk). It turns out that Steven has a bit of writer's block on a project and he asked me to stop by and help out.

I thought it was a pretty funny spoof of the self-important (okay, egomaniacal) vacation posts some people have been using. No, I didn't go to China, I went to Costa Rica (more on this soon). I was surprised, though, to discover that a whole bunch of people thought I was serious.

Now, that could be because some of my correspondents have such high regard for me that they figured I really was working with Kofi Annan at the UN, but more likely it's because we just assume that email vacation notes are true. Same thing happens with phishing when hackers use email to steal passwords. What else are we assuming are true, when it might be a joke, or an opinion, or a fraud?

Nouns and verbs

I had two great seminars in my office this week. Not only do cool people show up, but it pushes me to think hard about new ways to talk about things that work.

Today, we talked about nouns and verbs.

Investments are a noun. Investing is a verb.
Paint is a noun. Painting is a verb.
A gift is a noun. Shopping for or giving one is a verb.

People care much more about verbs than nouns. They care about things that move, that are happening, that change. They care about experiences and events and the way things make us feel.

Nouns just sit there, inanimate lumps. Verbs are about wants and desires and wishes.

Is your website a noun or a verb?
What about your management style or the services you offer?

A few years ago, the rage was to turn products into services. Then it was to turn services into products.

I think the next big thing is to turn nouns into verbs.

Things that change

...are more interesting than those that don't.

I've gotten about a dozen emails about Google's clever way of indicating that they keep adding storage to gmail.

Gmailsize

Every time you visit your gmail account, you notice that the amount of storage you've been given goes up.

The same thing is true for the billboard on the bank near my house in Buffalo where I grew up. It didn't matter how many times we looked at it, we looked at it again when we drove by. Why?

TimetempBecause the time and temperature were always changing! (note that this is not the original Buffalo sign... the palm tree is a giveaway).

In most organizations, the frequency at which consumers are sent messages is far greater than the speed at which the organization actually changes. As a result, most of the messages are boring and repetitive. Which means that you're training your prospects and consumers to ignore the messages--why bother reading something if you already know what it says?

The best stories change over time. They change in ways that fascinate the consumer, and more important, they change in ways that are fun or important to talk about.

Of course you're not a commercial photographer

Why should you care what Don Giannatti thinks about marketing?

Because all marketing is the same. It doesn't matter if you're selling expensive photos for annual reports, cheeky babywear or a religion. It's still about spreading ideas.

Don's post is terrific: it's what I do...: Ok, let's buy TWO Spreads in the Annuals.

Target gets remarkable

Pills050411_1_250Lisa Kelley sent me this breakthrough pill bottle.

Link: A School of Visual Arts Grad Remakes the Pill Bottle.

Vindicated!

Thanks to Brian Peddle for the link: Atlas: Cookie Deletion Figures Exaggerated Wildly by Self-Reported Data � MarketingVOX.

I took a lot of heat from Jupiter and others when I said that the cookie deletion numbers were way off base.

It turns out that people aren't always entirely truthful with themselves and those that do surveys.

Nice to hear my gut is right every once in a (long) while.

Here's the original post:

Link: Seth's Blog: File under: stats that cannot be true.

"Airport Barber Stylists"

Do I really want an airport barber giving me a massage?

If I do, do I want to pay by the minute (sounds stressful)

and if I do, is this what he should be wearing?

DSC00456.JPG

Creative trademark infringement

YahuuSeen in the north Bronx of New York.

A sign that does not give me confidence in the owners or the patrons.

When advertisers insist on interruption

MoonriseThe sky's the limit.

Thanks to Damian for the link: Worth1000.com | Photoshop Contests | Are you Worthy™ | contest.

Playing by (and losing by) the rules

Market leaders make up the rules. They establish the systems and the covenants and the benchmarks that a market plays by.

(and yes, a market leader can be a church, a political party or a non-profit)

If you play by those rules, you will almost certainly lose.

After all, that's why market leaders make rules. They establish a game that they can win, over and over again, against smaller or newer competitors.

The alternative is both obvious and scary: Change the rules.

Newcomers and underdogs can only benefit when the rules change. The safe thing to do feels risky, because it involves playing by a fundamentally different set of assumptions. But in fact, dramatically changing the game is the safest thing you can do (if you want to grow).

« March 2005 | Main | May 2005 »