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SETH'S BOOKS

Seth Godin has written 12 bestsellers that have been translated into 33 languages

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all.marketers.tell.stories

All Marketers Tell Stories

Seth's most important book about the art of marketing

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free.prize.inside

Free Prize Inside

The practical sequel to Purple Cow

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linchpin

Linchpin

An instant bestseller, the book that brings all of Seth's ideas together.

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meatball.sundae

Meatball Sundae

Why the internet works (and doesn't) for your business. And vice versa.

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permission.marketing

Permission Marketing

The classic Named "Best Business Book" by Fortune.

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poke.the.box

Poke The Box

The latest book, Poke The Box is a call to action about the initiative you're taking - in your job or in your life, and Seth once again breaks the traditional publishing model by releasing it through The Domino Project.

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purple.cow

Purple Cow

The worldwide bestseller. Essential reading about remarkable products and services.

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small.is.the.new.big

Small is the New Big

A long book filled with short pieces from Fast Company and the blog. Guaranteed to make you think.

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survival.is.not.enough

Survival is Not Enough

Seth's worst seller and personal favorite. Change. How it works (and doesn't).

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the.big.moo

The Big Moo

All for charity. Includes original work from Malcolm Gladwell, Tom Peters and Promise Phelon.

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the.big.red.fez

The Big Red Fez

Top 5 Amazon ebestseller for a year. All about web sites that work.

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the.dip

The Dip

A short book about quitting and being the best in the world. It's about life, not just marketing.

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the.icarus.deception

The Icarus Deception

Seth's most personal book, a look at the end of the industrial economy and what happens next.

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tribes

Tribes

"Book of the year," a perennial bestseller about leading, connecting and creating movements.

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unleashing.the.ideavirus

Unleashing the Ideavirus

More than 3,000,000 copies downloaded, perhaps the most important book to read about creating ideas that spread.

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v.is.for.vulnerable

V Is For Vulnerable

A short, illustrated, kids-like book that takes the last chapter of Icarus and turns it into something worth sharing.

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we.are.all.weird

We Are All Weird

The end of mass and how you can succeed by delighting a niche.

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whatcha.gonna.do.with.that.duck

Whatcha Gonna Do With That Duck?

The sequel to Small is the New Big. More than 600 pages of the best of Seth's blog.

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THE DIP BLOG by Seth Godin




All Marketers Are Liars Blog




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« real good for free | Main | a beautiful thing »

Don't change, sue

I continue to be puzzled by the car industry's ongoing fight against better mileage (Bennington Banner - Headlines.) Imagine how moribund the computer industry would be if processors never got faster. You'd only buy a new computer when your old one got too dusty.

If mileage requirements went up, people wouldn't buy FEWER cars. They'd buy more cars, more often. Yes, there's no question that short-sighted consumers are regularly seduced by low initial prices or big car styling and buy a car that costs them a lot more in the long run. But if mileage standards go up, those cars cease to be an option. What happens instead is that there's movement, always a car a little better as they march to the standard, which gives you a reason to upgrade.

The result would be a race to make better and better cars (and to buy cars that are cheaper and cheaper to operate.) If the cars are cheaper to run, then, over time, people will actually be willing to pay more for them, won't they?

If I were a big company CEO facing such an incredible level of uncertainty about the key input to my product (the price of gas), why wouldn't this be a great way to simultaneously level the playing field (ten years from now, which is plenty of time to get ready).

It's like the cigarette companies. Think about how much they would have pocketed in profits if they had supported a ban on advertising ten years ago. Billions and billions of dollars...

In the face of change, reactionary stuck companies don't look to marketing or innovation. They sue.

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Don't change, sue:

» What's the real improvement? from If it's got an engine . . .
Seth Godin posted today a diatribe against the automotive industry regarding their refusal to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles. I agree: better fuel economy is a good thing. What I disagree with is this argument: [Read More]

» Forward Facing Innovation vs. Backward Facing Innovation from Thinking by Peter Davidson
The auto industry like so many others (music industry *cough*) feel they have too much invested in the status quo to embrace real change. They can tweak and twiddle under the hood but not redefine what the use of a vehicle is all about. The ground ... [Read More]

» My Monthly Mention of The Gas Mileage Disappointment from Outhouse Tech
I've said enough previously about gas prices that it's no longer interesting for me to expound, but this guy over here recently made some more fun gas mileage mockery, and more importantly, my favorite marketer Seth Godin recently had this to say about... [Read More]

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