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WWW SETH'S BLOG

SETH'S BOOKS

Seth Godin has written 12 bestsellers that have been translated into 33 languages

The complete list of online retailers

Bonus stuff!

or click on a title below to see the list

all.marketers.tell.stories

All Marketers Tell Stories

Seth's most important book about the art of marketing

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

free.prize.inside

Free Prize Inside

The practical sequel to Purple Cow

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

linchpin

Linchpin

An instant bestseller, the book that brings all of Seth's ideas together.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

meatball.sundae

Meatball Sundae

Why the internet works (and doesn't) for your business. And vice versa.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

permission.marketing

Permission Marketing

The classic Named "Best Business Book" by Fortune.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

poke.the.box

Poke The Box

The latest book, Poke The Box is a call to action about the initiative you're taking - in your job or in your life, and Seth once again breaks the traditional publishing model by releasing it through The Domino Project.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

purple.cow

Purple Cow

The worldwide bestseller. Essential reading about remarkable products and services.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

small.is.the.new.big

Small is the New Big

A long book filled with short pieces from Fast Company and the blog. Guaranteed to make you think.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

survival.is.not.enough

Survival is Not Enough

Seth's worst seller and personal favorite. Change. How it works (and doesn't).

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.moo

The Big Moo

All for charity. Includes original work from Malcolm Gladwell, Tom Peters and Promise Phelon.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.red.fez

The Big Red Fez

Top 5 Amazon ebestseller for a year. All about web sites that work.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.dip

The Dip

A short book about quitting and being the best in the world. It's about life, not just marketing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.icarus.deception

The Icarus Deception

Seth's most personal book, a look at the end of the industrial economy and what happens next.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

tribes

Tribes

"Book of the year," a perennial bestseller about leading, connecting and creating movements.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

unleashing.the.ideavirus

Unleashing the Ideavirus

More than 3,000,000 copies downloaded, perhaps the most important book to read about creating ideas that spread.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

v.is.for.vulnerable

V Is For Vulnerable

A short, illustrated, kids-like book that takes the last chapter of Icarus and turns it into something worth sharing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

we.are.all.weird

We Are All Weird

The end of mass and how you can succeed by delighting a niche.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

whatcha.gonna.do.with.that.duck

Whatcha Gonna Do With That Duck?

The sequel to Small is the New Big. More than 600 pages of the best of Seth's blog.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:


THE DIP BLOG by Seth Godin




All Marketers Are Liars Blog




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Member since 08/2003

« Free stuff, self-promotion and repetition | Main | The Web 2.0 Traffic List »

...in the middle, Starting

When a director makes a movie, she can be pretty confident that the audience will see it from the beginning straight through to the end.

When I write a book, I have the same luxury. That’s usually the case when I give a speech as well. It’s awfully frustrating to be giving a talk to a dozen people and then have the head guy walk in ten minutes late... now what do I do? Do I start over and bore the people kind enough to be on time (though possibly succeed in my argument to the head guy) or do I press on? If the beginning wasn’t important, I wouldn’t have wasted all that time on it!

Major advertisers have the expectation that they don't need to keep reintroducing themselves. People know who Coke and Nike are. The new ads can pick up in the middle without explaining exactly what “Mountain Dew” is.

Unlike books and movies and speeches and sales pitches, it’s pretty obvious that blogs and websites don’t work that way. The traffic for almost all blogs is growing, in some cases quite quickly. Some websites double in traffic every month or two. My blogometer tells me that about half of the people who read my blog each week have never been here before.

Hence the dilemma.

Blog writing is different than almost any other sort of exposition. Some people have been with you for years. They understand your conventions, your shorthands and your biases. They know you’ve written a few books, appeared as a child actor in Star Trek or have a deep and abiding hatred for cats. You can drop a few hints and they get it.

The rest of your readers are left clueless.

Which leads to the squeaky wheel problem. Among your newbies are several people who won’t hesitate to send you an email, post a comment or leave in a huff. They don’t get it and they want you to know they don’t get it.

Your inclination, if you’re at all like me, is to have that person’s voice in the back of your head every time you post an entry or design a page. “But what about Fred, who just got here?” If you’re working in an organization, the voice will be even louder. Your peers will remind you of the Freds of the world every time they hear from them.

Resist!

Starbucks doesn’t start over every time someone walks in, and neither does your church. Great websites don’t explain every little icon in big type--they give newbies a chance to figure it out and they let the regulars use a tool they enjoy.

Some of the most popular blogs and websites on the web are hard to understand the first time you get there. Not hard for hard’s sake, but hard because there’s a lot of power in a little space and explaining it all would actually make it work worse.

If I was always trying to catch people up, I’d end every post by pointing to my lens. But I won’t, because then you’d stop reading, wouldn’t you?

One opportunity that's underused is the idea of using cookies to treat returning visitors differently than newbies. It's more work at first, but it can offer two experiences to two different sorts of people.

Nothing grows forever, and no doubt, one day in the next decade the bulk of your readers will be caught up. But until then, the calculus of starting in the middle is always going to penalize--at least a little--the folks who just showed up, the folks who have been there for a while, or the writer. Just something to keep in mind when you are building your UI or writing your next missive.

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference ...in the middle, Starting:

» Starting All Over from The Agitator
Marketing maestro Seth Godin has a thought-provoking post called in the middle, Starting. His bottomline: Starbucks doesn't start all over again when someone walks in, and neither does your church.http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seth [Read More]

» riverrun, past Eve and Adam's from A Networked World
Seth Goodin does his James Joyce thing with ...in the middle, Starting. Some of the most popular blogs and websites on the web are hard to understand the first time you get there. Not hard for hard’s sake, but hard [Read More]

» Tien tips om de gebruiksvriendelijkheid van je weblog te vergroten from oomph
Seth Godin is een originele, inspirerende marketing guru en auteur van 'All marketeers are liars' en een flinke berg gratis e-books. Hij constateert dat weblogs die al een tijdje 'draaien' vaak lastig te begrijpen zijn voor mensen die ze voor [Read More]

» Repeat vs first time visitors from Michael Whitaker's blog
Every decent web analytics package can segment your traffic data by repeat vs first-time visitors. If you can track e-commerce transactions by $ amount you can also quickly see what the value of those two types of visitors is. You [Read More]

» Greet new or returning visitors: a WordPress plugin from Alaeddin's Blog
Ive mashed up a plugin that lets you put out a message anywhere on your blog for new visitors, and hide it for returning visitors. ... [Read More]

» Tipping Point for Trulia? from Future of Real Estate Marketing
MONEY magazine’s annual Best Places to Live feature launched today. Congrats to Middleton, WI which came out on top of the Great American Towns. As in years past, the list was compiled by Sperlings BestPlaces. It also uses local market ... [Read More]

« Free stuff, self-promotion and repetition | Main | The Web 2.0 Traffic List »