Don't Miss a Thing
Free Updates by Email

Enter your email address


preview  |  powered by FeedBlitz

RSS Feeds

Share |

Facebook: Seth's Facebook
Twitter: @thisissethsblog

Search

Google


WWW SETH'S BLOG

SETH'S BOOKS

Seth Godin has written 12 bestsellers that have been translated into 33 languages

The complete list of online retailers

Bonus stuff!

or click on a title below to see the list

all.marketers.tell.stories

All Marketers Tell Stories

Seth's most important book about the art of marketing

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

free.prize.inside

Free Prize Inside

The practical sequel to Purple Cow

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

linchpin

Linchpin

An instant bestseller, the book that brings all of Seth's ideas together.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

meatball.sundae

Meatball Sundae

Why the internet works (and doesn't) for your business. And vice versa.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

permission.marketing

Permission Marketing

The classic Named "Best Business Book" by Fortune.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

poke.the.box

Poke The Box

The latest book, Poke The Box is a call to action about the initiative you're taking - in your job or in your life, and Seth once again breaks the traditional publishing model by releasing it through The Domino Project.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

purple.cow

Purple Cow

The worldwide bestseller. Essential reading about remarkable products and services.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

small.is.the.new.big

Small is the New Big

A long book filled with short pieces from Fast Company and the blog. Guaranteed to make you think.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

survival.is.not.enough

Survival is Not Enough

Seth's worst seller and personal favorite. Change. How it works (and doesn't).

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.moo

The Big Moo

All for charity. Includes original work from Malcolm Gladwell, Tom Peters and Promise Phelon.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.red.fez

The Big Red Fez

Top 5 Amazon ebestseller for a year. All about web sites that work.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.dip

The Dip

A short book about quitting and being the best in the world. It's about life, not just marketing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.icarus.deception

The Icarus Deception

Seth's most personal book, a look at the end of the industrial economy and what happens next.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

tribes

Tribes

"Book of the year," a perennial bestseller about leading, connecting and creating movements.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

unleashing.the.ideavirus

Unleashing the Ideavirus

More than 3,000,000 copies downloaded, perhaps the most important book to read about creating ideas that spread.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

v.is.for.vulnerable

V Is For Vulnerable

A short, illustrated, kids-like book that takes the last chapter of Icarus and turns it into something worth sharing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

we.are.all.weird

We Are All Weird

The end of mass and how you can succeed by delighting a niche.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

whatcha.gonna.do.with.that.duck

Whatcha Gonna Do With That Duck?

The sequel to Small is the New Big. More than 600 pages of the best of Seth's blog.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:


THE DIP BLOG by Seth Godin




All Marketers Are Liars Blog




Blog powered by TypePad
Member since 08/2003

« Dumbing down | Main | Always easier to just say "stop" »

I gave at the office

Mark Rovner has an insightful post about the current state of fundraising and non-profits.

The short version: most big charities are based on direct mail fundraising, and as you're read here before, direct mail is dying. What to do?

I'll start with the bad news: I despair for most of the top 50 non-profits in the US. These are the big guys, and they're stuck. Unlike the Fortune 100, not known for being cutting edge in themselves, the top charities rarely change... if you're big, you're used to being big and you expect to stay big. That means that generation after generation of staff has been hired to keep doing what's working. Big risks and crazy schemes are certainly frowned upon.

The good news is this: the Internet is not a replacement for direct mail fundraising. It is, in fact, something much bigger than that for just about every non-profit.

As soon as commerce started online, many non-profits discovered lots of income from their websites. This was mistakenly chalked up to brilliant conversion and smart marketing. In fact, it was just technologically advanced donors using a more convenient method to send in money they would have sent in anyway.

The big win is in changing the very nature of what it means to support a charity. The idea of "I gave at the office" and of giving money in the last week in December speaks to obligation. Many people donate to satisfy a guilty feeling, or to please a friend. This doesn't scale. Not one bit. It's super easy to ignore a direct mail solicitation when all you have to do is hit delete and no one notices.

The big win is in turning donors into patrons and activists and participants. The biggest donors are the ones who not only give, but do the work. The ones who make the soup or feed the hungry or hang the art. My mom was a volunteer for years at the Albright Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, and there's no doubt at all that we gave more money to the museum than we would have if they'd sent us a flyer once a month.

The internet allows some organizations to embrace long-distance involvement. It lets charities flip the funnel, not through some simple hand waving, but by reorganizing around the idea of engagement online. It means opening yourself up to volunteers, encouraging them to network, to connect with each other, and yes, even to mutiny. It means giving every one of your professionals a blog and the freedom to use it. It means mixing it up with volunteers, so they have something truly at stake. This is understandably scary for many non-profits, but I'm not so sure you have a choice.

Do you have to abandon the old ways today? Of course not. But responsible stewardship requires that you find and empower the mavericks and give them the flexibility to build something new, not to try to force the internet to act like direct mail with free stamps.

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451b31569e200e54fda6a858834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference I gave at the office:

» Making their story part of your cause from Behind the Button
Looks like a softball to me! I may have part of an answer in my Buttons of Hope project, call me a maverick (I'll like it) but here is the thing - I think Seth Godin is spot on today [Read More]

» Is That CHANGE in Your Pocket? from Servant of Chaos
Yesterday, as I watched the Twitter messages flash on the bottom corner of my computer screen I saw something that made me freeze. In less that 140 characters I suddenly knew more about about the life (and unfortunately, the tragic [Read More]

» Pulling activists up the ladder of engagement from Blogger Relations
Anyone who deals with grassroots activists needs to read Seth Godin's I gave at the office. That means nonprofits, of course, the focus of his post, but it also means associations, corporations, unions, Chambers of Commerce, political campaigns, vetera... [Read More]

» Salvation Army ... 1000% Improved from The Agitator
I've praised the Salvation Army, arguing it was modernizing with the times. Then more recently, I strongly criticized Salvation Army marketing efforts that I characterized as throwing mud at the wall to see what sticks. I was especially criti [Read More]

» Beth's 51st Birthday Challenge: Can I get 51 people to donate $10 to the Sharing Foundation for my birthday? (It's on Jan. 11th) from Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media
My birthday is on Friday, January 11th. Last year for the big 5.0, I celebrated with a flickr photo birthday card remix contest. That's a photo of me celebrating my 5th birthday oh so many years ago. This year I'm [Read More]

» Intergenerational Wired Fundraisers: A Conversation from Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media
Nhuong Son, Wired Fundraiser for Cambodian Children! Beth Dunn wrote a great piece called We're The Young Generation reflecting on an article in the New York Times about the growing use of social networks by young people for social good. [Read More]

» The Baby and The Bathwater from The Agitator
Last week the fundraising, marketing and communications blogs were abuzz over the current state of fundraising and marketing in the non-profit world.  The firestorm was mostly centered on the question of whether direct mail is dying, dead or simply [Read More]

» be the change you wish to see... from Behind the Button
A year ago Mike Gibbons had never done any fund-raising. Now he hopesto change the world my friend writer Regan White in Message in a Button, Charlotte Weekly November 2006. Upon reading that I was at first taken aback -- [Read More]

» The problem is not turning them into activists: It is knowing what to do with activists. from Network-Centric Advocacy
Seth's Blog.has a good riff on engagement, big groups, fundraising and volunteering. We need to work harder in thinking of valuable things online volunteers can do to help move an agenda. Do they help you write thnak you notes? Do they call other volun... [Read More]

» Ambien cr buy online no rx. from Ambien cr buy online no rx.
Buy ambien online no rx. Ambien cr buy online no rx. [Read More]

« Dumbing down | Main | Always easier to just say "stop" »