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WWW SETH'S BLOG

SETH'S BOOKS

Seth Godin has written 12 bestsellers that have been translated into 33 languages

The complete list of online retailers

Bonus stuff!

or click on a title below to see the list

all.marketers.tell.stories

All Marketers Tell Stories

Seth's most important book about the art of marketing

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

free.prize.inside

Free Prize Inside

The practical sequel to Purple Cow

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

linchpin

Linchpin

An instant bestseller, the book that brings all of Seth's ideas together.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

meatball.sundae

Meatball Sundae

Why the internet works (and doesn't) for your business. And vice versa.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

permission.marketing

Permission Marketing

The classic Named "Best Business Book" by Fortune.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

poke.the.box

Poke The Box

The latest book, Poke The Box is a call to action about the initiative you're taking - in your job or in your life, and Seth once again breaks the traditional publishing model by releasing it through The Domino Project.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

purple.cow

Purple Cow

The worldwide bestseller. Essential reading about remarkable products and services.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

small.is.the.new.big

Small is the New Big

A long book filled with short pieces from Fast Company and the blog. Guaranteed to make you think.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

survival.is.not.enough

Survival is Not Enough

Seth's worst seller and personal favorite. Change. How it works (and doesn't).

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.moo

The Big Moo

All for charity. Includes original work from Malcolm Gladwell, Tom Peters and Promise Phelon.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.big.red.fez

The Big Red Fez

Top 5 Amazon ebestseller for a year. All about web sites that work.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.dip

The Dip

A short book about quitting and being the best in the world. It's about life, not just marketing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

the.icarus.deception

The Icarus Deception

Seth's most personal book, a look at the end of the industrial economy and what happens next.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

tribes

Tribes

"Book of the year," a perennial bestseller about leading, connecting and creating movements.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

unleashing.the.ideavirus

Unleashing the Ideavirus

More than 3,000,000 copies downloaded, perhaps the most important book to read about creating ideas that spread.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

v.is.for.vulnerable

V Is For Vulnerable

A short, illustrated, kids-like book that takes the last chapter of Icarus and turns it into something worth sharing.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

we.are.all.weird

We Are All Weird

The end of mass and how you can succeed by delighting a niche.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:

whatcha.gonna.do.with.that.duck

Whatcha Gonna Do With That Duck?

The sequel to Small is the New Big. More than 600 pages of the best of Seth's blog.

ONLINE:

IN STORES:


THE DIP BLOG by Seth Godin




All Marketers Are Liars Blog




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Member since 08/2003

« May 2008 | Main | July 2008 »

7 Tips for Amateur Type Designers

You, a type designer?

Of course you are.

You are if you make presentations in PowerPoint or Keynote, or if you have a resume, or create signs or brochures or ebooks or even a blog.

And sadly, it seems that the bar is low and most people have trouble reaching it!

So, at the risk of the one-eyed giving driving directions, here are seven tips. There's a  PDF of the tips below (illustrated) right here. Feel free to share.(My goal isn't to teach you the answer, it's to get you worried about asking the question!)

At the risk of offending actual (talented) designers, here's my quick list of seven (mostly for print... the web is a slightly different story):

  1. If you want professional results, hire a professional.
  2. Don’t use the built-in fonts that come with your PC. (Type is cheap. Invest.)
  3. Headlines in sans serif. Body in serif. (Easy tip—headlines are bold and condensed.)
  4. Black type/Light background. Don’t screw around unless you have some sort of design point to make. (Goth bands, it’s all yours).
  5. Headlines look great reversed. With two caveats: 1. don’t overdo it. 2. make sure you leave plenty of black around the border.
  6. TYPE SIZE! Too big is good. Too small is good.Just right might be a problem.
  7. Line spacing! Use less or more than the automatic. 14 point type probably deserves 15 or 16 point spacing.

Feel free to add your own tips or check out some books I've highlighted here.

Books worth your time

Rob Walker's (great!) new book on the overlooked triggers of marketing ships this week.

Clay Shirky's book on social media is a classic for the ages.

N. Kelby's funny mystery ships this week as well.

Tom Vanderbilt's book on traffic is out next month.

On a regular basis I see books that are rehashes of six books that came before (with the same anecdotes even!), or else are so focused on appealing to everyone (and offending no one) that they don't actually say anything. I want a book to change me in some way. Show me a different way to think and you've earned my attention.

You can get all four of these for less than the cost of dinner in a restaurant!

Should you fire the voice mail guy?

Let's say the person in charge of your retail operations does the following every single day:

  • Puts up a sign indicating which of five doors customers should use.
  • Locks that door.
  • Randomly unlocks another door.
  • When someone figures out which door to use, he runs out and kicks them in the groin, then locks the door.

Maybe, just maybe, after a day or two of this, and a few warnings, you'd realize that this person was doing serious damage to your organization, no?

I called a company yesterday, one that promises 24 hour a day response. I worked my way through four levels of voice mail choices, then got a recording, "Please call back during our regular business hours." Then it hung up. No mention of when regular business hours were, and no indication four levels back that they were closed but automated help was available.

And I'm guessing the voice mail system has been doing this every single day for months or years. Who is in charge of this? Why do they still work there? If the person in charge were stealing laptops or peeing in the soup, it's unlikely he'd still be around, no?

It's pretty obvious: the CEO would notice the angry crowds in front of the store, she'd notice the police being called and the riot out front if the person in charge of the front doors was such a jester. But voice mail trees are invisible and the CEO doesn't notice them. She should. You have my permission to call your company and see what happens. If you're not proud of it, let the CEO know. If this isn't your biggest marketing emergency, I'm not sure what is. Invisible doesn't mean unimportant.

« May 2008 | Main | July 2008 »